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Allow glossaries that contain both non-translatables and regular expressions

Would it be possible to allow glossaries that contain both non-translatables and regular expressions?


Now only one of the corresponding checkboxes in the resource definition dialogue box can be selected at the same time.


I think that there is a use for glossaries that contain non-translatables that contain regular expressions.


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No pipes would be needed. CafeTran Espresso 2019 replaces all spaces with \s and all number groups with \d+ (I think that these two are the most frequent ones). Or ... CafeTran Espresso 2019 doesn't replace them, keeps the entries literary and interprets them as regular expressions.


More simple and intuitive for the users?

Additionally: It would be handy if all individual words of a multi-word expression would be ignored during spell-checking (without the need of adding all these components as non-translatables too).


So, in short: Everything on one line in a non-translatables glossary is considered to be one expression (no \s etc. needed). And all words are ignored during spell-checking (though this can have some disadvantages):


John Abrahams

Quartier Latin

Im Weißen Rößl


(It can be tricky to have 'Im' ignored in spell-checking.)

>(It can be tricky to have 'Im' ignored in spell-checking.)


Perhaps this can be solved like this:


  • If a line in a non-translatables glossary starts with a pipe, you'll have to add the individual words on separate lines too, in order to have them ignored in spell-checking.
  • If a line in a non-translatables glossary doesn't start with a pipe, all individual words will be ignored in spell-checking.
This way, you can prevent the 'Im' to be ignored in spell-checking if you enter it like this: |Im\sWeißen\sRößl.

Perhaps it's a simple and intuitive solution to let the user insert non-breaking spaces in all multi-word entries in non-translatables glossaries? CafeTran Espresso 2019 could interpret these non-breaking space internally as \s.

Perhaps also smart handling of the ampersand?


Instead of:

|Johnson\s\&\sJohnson


Just a simple:


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