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Q: CT on Windows10 on Parallels

 Hi,


I'm considering migrating to the Windows version of CT on Parallels Desktop.


I have two questions.


1. As some may know, CT on Parallels is too small (even when the screen size is enlarged to 200%!). I think there was a topic at the deceased CafeTranWiki mentioning some kind of software solution for this environment (?).


Is there any way I can adjust the "whole interface" (not only the font etc.) nicely?


2. I've found some open-source and third-party commercial fonts are corrupted on Windows CT. One example is Source Han Sans released by Adobe (the same font set was released by Google under a different name, Noto Sans CJK). How can I work with them comfortably?



Cheers,



Want to use Windows versions of dictionaries or do you have another reason to not run CafeTran at the Mac side? I have it installed in Parallels previous version with Win 8.1. Had to isolate it from Mac to force CafeTran to use the Java version at the Win side.
Hi,

The main reason is that I want to use CT in conjunction with off-line MT software (as a glossary manager) via an auto-learn/clipboard managing tool (Typing Assistant). And this workflow works most effectively when all these tools are on Windows.

 

Anyway, WFP3, which is also Java-based, looks fine (not too small) in the same environment. So, I think there's a way to adjust the size of CT nicely.

CafeTran looks good in Win 8.1 on mbp retina
Textexpander for Mac: Reminds you of missed opportunities to use your abbreviations
>> CafeTran looks good in Win 8.1 on mbp retina

 

Oh! My environment is Win10 on mbp retina. Any custom settings?

Maybe try VirtualBox?
Thank you, everybody!

I'm coming near to what I want to do!

 

Hi,

As I just became a licensed CT user on Windows, I want to request something.

1. Font size adjustment

When the Windows screen is enlarged, I confirmed that most of CT's interface elements (the menu bar etc.) are enlarged proportionally. The only exception seems to be the font size in user-editable panes such as the source/target segments.

For example (with the same font), 30 pt in CT (max.) visually equals 9 pt in WFP3 (when the screen is enlarged to 300%).


 So, my request is for (more exactly) proportional adjustment of the font size in these panes.



2. Request for greater support for Japanese font sets, at least the one mentioned above.


Garbled now:




Cheers,


I'd be interested in your workflow. I'm considering to learn Japanese myself. Shouldn't be too difficult.

Hi, Mr. CafeTran

The workflow I'm planning is as follows. Please read this posting when you have time (this is gonna be a little bit long).


I'm still in pursuit of quicker access to the most appropriate terms (because of my poor physical memory)

 

My strategy is CT + customizable off-line MT tool + auto-suggestion tool.


(The virtual machine is not part of it. The only reason for my requests above is that it's my current environment.)






The point is: Why bother building my own glossaries for CT when I have an off-line MT tool that comes with glossaries having nearly 8 million entries in total?


To tell the truth, I'm really exhausted with glossary building for CT, especially when Japanese is the source language: no spell checker (of course), hence no stem-based fuzzy matching. As I add every thinkable trigger word (source) to my glossaries, the F2 list gets longer, often intolerably long, too long to be useful at all.


Then, why not using the context field to narrow down the possibilities? It might be useful, but not economical. It requires additional work.


So, I've decided to dispense with my glossaries, working with segments TMs only, consulting the MT tool for possible term/phrase translations whenever necessary.


One benefit of this approach is that this tool can highlight term matches in different colors according to their respective source glossaries.


Example:


Red: Mandatory glossary (often, client-specified terms) = High priority

Blue: Project-specific glossary (other than the red ones) = Medium priority

Green: User glossary (general) = Low priority

Black: Others = Extra-low priority



And when there are alternative translations, you can choose the most appropriate one from a pop-up list.





Of course, your selection is remembered and applied first in all subsequent segments.



And what's next? Copy and Paste? The typing aid tool can do more. (In this case, I turn off CT's auto-completion because of the suggestion panel interference)



Select the selected translation and press a hot key, and it is automatically added to an auto-learned words list and appears at the top of the suggestion panel.





If you expect that the word will not be used many times again, you can alternatively copy it (add it to the clipboard). The result is the same: it is shown as the first suggestion.

The only difference is that this tool can store up to 200 words/phrases from the clipboard (the least frequently selected word is destined to disappear), while it can remember up to 5,000 words/phrases per auto-learned words list. Of course, you don't have to add common words like "words," "phrases," and so on. They are already in the tool.

And you can create any number of words lists as you wish: for a particular type of project, for a certain client, etc. It's as if you ran CT's "preliminary matching" with your glossaries and saved the results for a specific future use: a longer suggestion panel is not necessarily more useful.

=======

So, why don't I use the MT tool alone? Just because CT has many advantages over it.

Well, so much for today. Thank you for your attention.

>The point is: Why bother building my own glossaries for CT when I have an off-line MT tool that comes with glossaries having nearly 8 million entries in total?


That's indeed very impressive. And all high quality?


>

>To tell the truth, I'm really exhausted with glossary building for CT, especially when Japanese is the source language: no spell checker (of course), hence no stem-based fuzzy matching. As I add every thinkable trigger word (source) to my glossaries,


same approach as I have, started with it many years ago, in other tools


> the F2 list gets longer, often intolerably long, too long to be useful at all.


I don't use F2 at all, I make my entries longer, when they're not correct


but perhaps that approach doesn't work for Japanese


>

>Then, why not using the context field to narrow down the possibilities? It might be useful, but not economical. It requires additional work.


The adding of more context doesn't cost much extra work


>One benefit of this approach is that this tool can highlight term matches in different colors according to their respective source glossaries.


Would be nice for CafeTran too



>And when there are alternative translations, you can choose the most appropriate one from a pop-up list.

>

>

>

>

>

>Of course, your selection is remembered and applied first in all subsequent segments.



Same as in CafeTran

No other CAT tool does offer this


>And you can create any number of words lists as you wish: for a particular type of project, for a certain client, etc. It's as if you ran CT's "preliminary matching" with your glossaries and saved the results for a specific future use: 


I think the other hans uses that approach


Perhaps one day a short movie?

Hi,

>> That's indeed very impressive. And all high quality?

It's glossaries are very simple: only the source and the target. You'd have to consult some dictionary (with explanations) to know whether its suggestions are appropriate or not, unless you know they are perfectly right! A waste of time, of course, but it's still saving more time than wasting.

 


>> I don't use F2 at all, I make my entries longer, when they're not correct



I'd like to know exactly what you mean by "make my entries longer, when they're not correct." Can be a good tip for me.


I just confirmed that CT's auto-completion can pick up terms pasted onto the target segment, even when they are not in any of your local resources. But it seems to work only for single words, not for phrases.


Part of my headache could be removed if CT can add the contents of the clipboard (not only the latest one) to the auto-completion panel as an option. Any use for you?


Cheers,


>I'd like to know exactly what you mean by "make my entries longer, when they're not correct."


I add so much context to the glossary entry, that it'll be auto-assembled correctly next time.


So, for instance: if a certain verb has 5 different meanings, I add the substantive on which the action is performed, to limit the 5 possible meanings to the one that's correct.


Sometimes even that trick isn't possible, then I have to open the context menu and pick the correct translation with the left mouse button. In the rest of the session, this specific translation will be used.


Can you use this one?



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